56 376 new headstones on Genealogy Quebec!

Some 56 376 headstone pictures were added to the Obituary section, one of the 15 tools available to Genealogy Quebec subscribers.

These new images bring the total number of tombstones available on the website to over 668 000. Here are the cemeteries that were added or completed in this update:

Beauport, comté Québec, Québec
Broughton-Ouest, St-Pierre, comté de Beauce, Québec
Charette, comté St-Maurice, Québec
Clarence Creek, Ontario
Grand-Mère, cimetière St-Louis, comté de Champlain, Québec
Leeds, cimetière St-Jacques, comté de Mégantic, Québec
Lowell, catholique, Mass, USA
Beauport, Soeurs de la Charité, comté Québec, Québec
Beauport, St-Mathieu-de-Villeneuve, comté Québec, Québec
Beaupré, comté Charlevoix, Québec
Donnacona, comté Portneuf, Québec
Drummondville, rues Marchand, St-Joseph, comté Drummond, Québec
East Broughton, 1er cimetière, comté de Beauce, Québec
East Broughton, 2e cimetière, comté de Beauce, Québec
Girardville, comté Lac-St-Jean, Québec
Hervey-Jonction, comté Portneuf, Québec
Laval, Notre-Dame de l’Espérence, comté Laval, Québec
Les Écureuils, comté Portneuf, Québec
Manseau, comté Nicolet, Québec
Moonbeam, Saskatchewan
Notre-Dame-de-Beauport, comté Québec, Québec
Notre-Dame-de-Portneuf, comté Portneuf, Québec
Notre-Dame-du-Portage, comté Kamouraska, Québec
Ottawa, cimetière Notre-Dame, Ontario
Packington, St-Benoit, comté Témiscouata, Québec
Pont-Rouge, comté Portneuf, Québec
Québec (Boischatel), comté Québec, Québec
Québec, Belmont, comté Québec, Québec
Pointe-au-Père, comté Rimouski, Québec
Pont-Rouge, 2eme cimetière, comté Portneuf, Québec
Pont-Rouge, comté Portneuf, Québec
Québec, La Souvenance, comté Québec, Québec
Québec, St-Sauveur, comté Québec, Québec
Québec, Courville, comté Québec, Québec
Québec, Hôpital Général, comté Québec, Québec
Québec, Notre-Dame-de-Foy, comté Québec, Québec
Québec, Orsainville, comté Québec, Québec
Québec, Sillery, comté Québec, Québec
Québec, Soeurs Ste-Jeanne-d’Arc, comté Québec
Québec, St-Émile, comté Québec, Québec
Québec, Ste-Thérèse-de-Lisieux, comté Québec, Québec

Headstones on Genealogy Quebec

Every headstone available on Genealogy Quebec has been indexed and can be consulted in the Obituary section. The collection can be searched by last name and by the text written on the stone.

Click on the result you are interested in to view a picture of the stone.

The Obituary section also contains 3 other collections:

  • Internet obituaries, which contains obituaries published online from 1999 to today.
  • Newspaper obituaries, which contains obituaries from newspapers published between 1860 and today.
  • Memorial cards, which contains tens of thousands of memorial cards published between 1860 and today.

All of these collections are indexed and can be explored using a search engine.

The Obituary section may be browsed with a subscription to Genealogy Quebec at this address.

What is Genealogy Quebec?

Genealogy Quebec is a subscription based research website regrouping all of the collections and tools developed by the Drouin Institute over the course of its existence.

The website’s 15 tools and collections total for over 45 million images and files covering all of Quebec as well as part of the United States, Ontario and Acadia from 1621 to this day. Genealogy Quebec is by far the largest collection of Quebec genealogical and historical documents on the Web.

Genealogically yours,

The Drouin team

35 000 new Acadian family files on Genealogy Quebec

A major update was applied to the Acadia – Families tool, one of the 15 collections available to Genealogy Quebec subscribers.

Around 35 000 family files were added to the tool through this update.

What is the Acadia – Families tool?

The Acadia – Families tool contains 130 342 family files based on original Acadian records.

Currently, these records span from the beginning of the Acadian colony to the end of 1849. In addition, 30 locations covering from 1850 to the end of the available registers are included. A list of these locations as well as a more detailed overview of the collection are available on the Drouin Institute’s blog.

The files compile the information available about an individual. They generally contain the names and first names of the parents, the first name of the child, the dates of birth and/or baptism, death and/or burial, and marriage (a total of 239 517 dates), as well as the parish. The files usually provide links to the original documents of the baptisms, marriages and burials mentioned.


Family file from the Acadia – Families tool. Click on the blue links to view the original documents.


Original document from Acadia – Families

The Acadia – Families tool can be browsed with a subscription to Genealogy Quebec at this address.

 

Genealogy Quebec Forum

Do you have questions about GenealogyQuebec.comPRDH-IGD.com or genealogy in general? Do you want to share your research findings with other genealogy enthusiasts?


Look no further! Subscribe to the brand new Genealogy Quebec forum today. It is free and open to all!

Genealogically yours,

The Drouin team

Witnessing history through parish registers: The 1885 smallpox epidemic

Smallpox was a highly contagious and often fatal disease which was a real plague in several regions of the world until its eradication in 1979. Its impact on Quebec during its colonial period was discussed in the first part of this article.


An 1802 cartoon of the early controversy surrounding Edward Jenner’s vaccination theory, showing using his cowpox-derived smallpox vaccine causing cattle to emerge from patients. Wikimedia Commons.

Smallpox struck Quebec for the last time in 1885. Almost a century had passed since the conception of the smallpox vaccine, yet vaccination was not widespread among French Canadians despite efforts by governments to encourage or even impose it.

In March 1885, a conductor of the Grand Trunk Railway brought smallpox to Montreal. His bedsheets then infected Pélagie Robichaud, a worker in the laundry room of the hospital where the man was receiving treatment. She was the first to victim of the 1885 smallpox epidemic. Her burial indicates that she passed away in Montreal on April 2nd.


Source: Image d1p_1101a1007.JPG, Drouin Collection Records (Québec/Fonds Drouin/Mtl/Catholique/Montréal (Basilique Notre-Dame)/1880/1885/Sépultures/), GenealogyQuebec.com

Following the contagion of Pélagie Robichaud, the disease killed several thousand people in 1885 and 1886, with Montreal at the center of the epidemic. Vaccination was imposed on Montrealers, not without resistance: several anti-vaccination riots broke out among the suspicious population.

The anti-vaccine movement had influential figures on its side. Joseph Émery-Coderre, an eminent doctor campaigning against compulsory vaccination, is a notable example. The Catholic Church was called in to convince the reluctant population. Édouard-Charles Fabre, Bishop of Montreal at the time, played a decisive role in garnering public support for the vaccination campaign; he would order the priests of his diocese to do the same.

This crisis arose in a complex political context: it broke out at the same time as the North West rebellion, during which the Métis of the Prairies revolted against the Canadian government. The Métis of Western Canada, who are primarily descended from French Canadians and First Nations, were mostly French-speaking and Catholic, and their rebellion enjoyed considerable support in Quebec.

Its failure, which notably resulted in the hanging of Louis Riel, considerably exacerbated tensions between Francophones and Anglophones in Quebec as well as the distrust of French Canadians towards government directives. John A. Macdonald, then Prime Minister of Canada, is credited with the phrase “[Riel] shall hang though every dog in Quebec bark in his favour.”


Louis Riel and the Métis provisional government. Wikimedia Commons.

French and English-language newspapers were passing the buck, on the one hand evoking the hysteria of English Canadians and on the other hand the uncleanliness of French Canadians. On September 12th, 1885, L’Union des Cantons-de-l’Est, based in Victoriaville, published an article on the alleged ravages of smallpox. Here is the introduction:

” If we were to believe the American newspapers published in English, we would think that smallpox is decimating the good city of Montreal. Practically speaking, our commercial metropolis is currently in quarantine at this time! Many people are suffering, and many more will suffer from this state of affairs. And whose fault is it? It is your city’s press, good people of Montreal. It spread everywhere that smallpox was eating away at you, that the plague was taking on horrible proportions, that the whole city was going to have to go through it. “

Thus, this article accuses English-language newspapers of greatly exaggerating the proportions of the smallpox epidemic, especially since English Canadians seemed to attribute the gravity of the situation to French Canadians:

” Now, as there needs to be a bête noire everywhere, it was imagined that French Canadians must be the originators and propagators of the epidemic. The Montreal Herald accused our conationals of being ignorant, dirty, filthy, etc. This is a big slander! Our French Canadian women are generally clean, industrious, spending three quarters of their time washing and cleaning in their homes. “

However, this article does not reject science and recognizes the shortcomings of the French-Canadian population when it comes to hygiene.

” The ravages of indifference to reading and science are infinitely more to be feared than those of smallpox in Montreal, whose victims do not exceed a few dozen. “

      

Source: Image 00080.jpg, Drouin Institute’s Miscellaneous Collections (23 – Journaux anciens/L’Union des Cantons de l’Est (Arthabaskaville)/1867-1887/1885/), GenealogyQuebec.com

Also in September 1885, however, remedies and recipes for smallpox were published in L’Union des Cantons-de-l’Est, perpetuating the idea that vaccination was superfluous at best, if not dangerous.

” I remember reading in the (Journal de l’Instruction publique) that the Sarracenia root was an antidote against this disease. Quickly I set to work, I sent my altar boy, a young Montagnais, to fetch me the plant in question, we infused the root, scarcely had they taken two or three potions that they felt sensibly better, the fever disappeared, the pustules dried out, they were out of danger, they did not even bear the marks of smallpox. ”

” When Jenner discovered the cowpox vaccine in England, the world of science wanted to strike lightning upon his head; but when the most learned medical school in the universe, that of Paris, published this recipe for smallpox, it passed without a hitch. It is as infallible as fate and wins in all cases.
Zinc sulphate, 1 grain ; digitalis, 1 grain ; 1 1/2 teaspoon of sugar. Mix with two tablespoons of water. When the mixture is perfect add four ounces of water. Take a teaspoonful every hour. The disease will go away within twelve hours. “

              
Source: Images 00078.jpg and 00084.jpg, Drouin Institute’s Miscellaneous Collections (23 – Journaux anciens/L’Union des Cantons de l’Est (Arthabaskaville)/1867-1887/1885/), GenealogyQuebec.com

The 1885 epidemic was the last major health crisis related to smallpox in the Western world, just under a century before the complete eradication of the sickness thanks to vaccination. 1979 marked the end of the virus responsible for one of the deadliest contagious diseases in human history, of which only a few samples remain to this day for research purposes.

Marielle Côté-Gendreau
Student and Université de Montréal’s Programme de recherche en démographie historique (PRDH) collaborator.

Witnessing history through parish registers: Smallpox in the colonial era

Smallpox is a highly contagious and often fatal disease which was a real plague in several regions of the world until its eradication in 1979. It has invaded the French Canadian population on numerous occasions since the start of the colony, wreaking havoc in parishes.

It is under the names of petite vérole or picot(t)e that smallpox is most often designated in Quebec registers. This name of picote originates from the blisters which covered the bodies of the victims.


Illumination presenting a disease which seems to be smallpox, Toggenburg Bible (Switzerland), 1411. Wikimedia Commons.

The parish priest of L’Islet, a village in the historic region of Côte-du-Sud on the south shore of the St. Lawrence River southwest of Quebec City, highlighted the usage of these two terms in a rare note in the margin of a burial record. He registered on August 24th, 1792 the death of Marie Louise Bernier, 19th and “last dead of this disease, that is to say of the petite vérole or picote in Canadian or French terms since October 23rd, 1791”.


Source: Image d1p_51740348.jpg, Drouin Collection Records (Québec/Registres paroissiaux 1621-1876/L/L’Islet (Notre-Dame-du-Bon-Secours)/1790/1792/), GenealogyQuebec.com

Smallpox is the disease involved in the voluntary contamination of enemy First Nations with infected blankets during Pontiac’s War, an initiative reportedly approved by British officer Jeffrey Amherst. This event has been on the news in the past few years as the City of Montreal decided to rename Amherst street to “Atateken”. As smallpox was not present in America before the arrival of the Europeans, it was especially deadly among the Natives, who had no prior immunity.

On May 4th, 1709, Louis Miskouabemich, a man of the Nepissing First Nation, was baptized in Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue. The record says he was 110 years old, which is unlikely but certainly indicates an advanced age. The elder had previously received the ondoiement, a quick ceremony that takes the place of baptism if death is likely to occur before a proper baptism can be organized.

Indeed, Louis “[was] dangerously sick of small pox”. His age and possibly his social position gave him a very advantageous sponsorship: his godfather was none other than Philippe de Rigaud, Marquis de Vaudreuil, who was then Governor of New France. His wife Élisabeth de Joybert held the role of godmother. The couple were absent and represented at the ceremony by a couple of local notables.

Louis Miskouabemich died on June 27th of the same year.


Source: Record 14937, LAFRANCE, GenealogyQuebec.com

Smallpox was known to cause miscarriages and premature deliveries, and increase infant mortality rates. Many of these instances can be found in Quebec registers.

Marie Huguet dit Latour, from L’Ancienne-Lorette, near Quebec City, experienced a tragic end in 1755: “the first picotée who brought it from Quebec City died pregnant her child baptized by the midwife in its mother’s womb”. Her death occurred only 6 months after her marriage. The child, therefore assumed to be highly premature, clearly did not survive as it was ondoyé while still in the womb.


Source: Record 259406, LAFRANCE, GenealogyQuebec.com

Other traces of premature births due to smallpox can be uncovered in the Lachine registers. For example, in 1702, the burial of a child “born last night aged seven months his mother being sick of smallpox and in case of danger he was ondoyé by Jeanne Malteau the midwife”.


Source: Record14627, LAFRANCE, GenealogyQuebec.com

However, the family reconstructions available on PRDH-IGD tell us that the mother, Barbe Brunet, overcame the disease and died in Châteauguay at the respectable age of 74.

A few months after this child’s burial, a woman named Marie Fortin “died last night of smallpox while giving birth to a girl aged six and a half months who was immediately ondoyé by the midwife and then died and was buried in the same grave as her mother”.


Source: Record 14654, LAFRANCE, GenealogyQuebec.com

Smallpox also took an active part in a historic drama, the Expulsion of the Acadians by Great Britain and its American colonies in 1755, during which over 12,000 of them were torn away from their lands. Smallpox developed in certain groups, adding to the scourges of hunger, thirst, cold and other diseases that were already decimating the Acadians.

From the hundreds that reached Quebec, many were severely weakened by smallpox. The numerous burial records marked with “acc” or “acad” in the Quebec City registers, identifying Acadian deaths, are testimonies to this tragedy. The winter of 1757-1758 was particularly deadly.


December 26th to 28th, 1757, Notre-Dame-de-Québec. Note the numerous “Acad” margin notes on these pages of the Québec register.
Source: Image d1p_31431309.jpg, Drouin Collection Records (Québec/Fonds Drouin/QC/Catholique/Québec (Notre-Dame)/1750/1757/), GenealogyQuebec.com

The wandering of Acadians in exile would sometimes last several years, as illustrated by the burial in the cemetery of Saint-Cuthbert of Catherine, “Cadienne [Acadian woman] who died of smallpox after receiving all her sacraments as soon as she arrived in the said parish”, on November 6th, 1769.


Source: Record 440471, LAFRANCE, GenealogyQuebec.com

It appears that smallpox also affected the British army garrisoned in Quebec City. In the registers of Berthierville, formerly called Berthier-en-Haut, we can find this curious record, written in English:

We the undernamed persons do hereby certify that John Mackffee, soldier in the 28th Regiment and in Captain Darlis (?) Company and Jennet Forah were married and lawfully entered the bond of Matrimony, and that some time after, said Macfee was, by the Providence of God seized with the Small Pox and dyed at Quebec in June 1766
dated at Quebec the 10th day of September 1766


Source: Record 741600, LAFRANCE, GenealogyQuebec.com

This is followed by a paragraph written in French, which deems this strange act appropriate and authorizes the widow to contract a new marriage if she wishes.

This mortuary record appears to be in a suitable form according to the customs of the troops of this province; even though I do not know the signatures; if the person whose death is attested is the same person with whom the person who presents herself for a new marriage was married, you can regard her as a widow and carry on. Only take care to verify her name as much as you can
in Montreal on May 6th, 1768


Source: Image d1p_1161b0055.jpg, Drouin Collection Records (Québec/Fonds Drouin/B/Berthierville/1760/1766/), GenealogyQuebec.com

10 years later, smallpox played an important role in the failure of the invasion of British Quebec by the American revolutionaries in 1775-1776. An epidemic in the rebel ranks considerably reduced the troops available and forced the abandonment of the project of conquest.

Thus, smallpox periodically affected the inhabitants of Quebec for two centuries with epidemics of varying severity. It struck Quebec for the last time in 1885. Montreal then became the epicenter of a severe epidemic. This crisis and its repercussions, both sanitary and political, will be discussed in the second part of this article.

Marielle Côté-Gendreau
Student and Université de Montréal’s Programme de recherche en démographie historique (PRDH) collaborator.

LAFRANCE update: New Acadian records on Genealogy Quebec

The indexing of parish registers from Ontario and Acadia continues on Genealogy Quebec, with some 6071 baptism and burial records added to the LAFRANCE this month.


Marriage record as presented on GenealogyQuebec.com’s LAFRANCE

The two main parishes included in this update are Tracadie, New Brunswick, and Arichat, Nova Scotia. The added records span from 1798 to 1861 for Tracadie, and 1839 to 1861 for Arichat.

These records can be browsed in the LAFRANCE, which also contains ALL of Quebec’s Catholic marriages from 1621 to 1918, ALL of Quebec’s Catholic baptisms and burials from 1621 to 1861 as well as ALL of Quebec’s Protestant marriages from 1760 to 1849.
You will find more information about the LAFRANCE on the Drouin Institute’s blog.

Genealogically yours,

The Drouin team

The Genealogy Quebec Forum

The Drouin Genealogical Institute is happy to announce the opening of its official forum! Come share your passion for genealogy and history with members of our team and our community!

This forum is accessible to everyone, whether you are a member of Genealogy Quebec and PRDH-IGD or not.

The sections

The forum is divided into 3 sections: “Help and technical support”, “Genealogy questions” and “Share your research and discoveries”.

Help and technical support

This section is used to submit any question or problem related to the use of PRDH-IGD.com and GenealogyQuebec.com. You may ask questions about the subscription process, the content of the databases, research tips, or anything else related to the sites. Refer to the “Genealogy questions” section for questions that are not directly related to the websites.

Genealogy questions

This section is dedicated to any question related to genealogy and history research. Refer to the “Help and technical support” section for questions specific to PRDH-IGD and Genealogy Quebec.

Share your research and discoveries

As the name suggests, this section is used to share the results of your research as well as your most interesting genealogical and historical findings. Share your successes and failures, your most complex cases and your most unusual stories!

Join the discussion

Please note that your PRDH-IGD.com and GenealogyQuebec.com login information cannot be used on the forum. To participate, you will need to register a new account on the forum.

The forum is in constant development! Please feel free to share your suggestions and comments with us, so that we can provide you with the best possible discussion platform.

 

Genealogically yours,

The Drouin team

25 000 Newspaper obituaries added to Genealogy Quebec

25 000 newspaper obituaries were added to Genealogy Quebec‘s Obituary section in May, bringing the collection to a total of over 700 000 death notices.

These new obituaries come from across Quebec and are dated, for the most part, from the 21st century.

  

Newspaper obituaries can be browsed in the Obituary section on GenealogyQuebec.com, which contains most of the obituaries, memorial cards and headstones available on the website. It is divided in 4 sub-sections:

  • Internet obituaries, which contains obituaries published online from 1999 to today.
  • Newspaper obituaries, which contains obituaries from newspapers published between 1860 and today.
  • Tombstones, which contains pictures of headstones from hundreds of cemeteries in Quebec and Ontario.
  • Memorial cards, which contains tens of thousands of memorial cards published between 1860 and today.

These subsections are indexed and can be browsed using a search engine. You will find more information about the Obituary section on the Drouin Institute blog.

 

 

Genealogically yours,

The Drouin team

Contest winners and 60% off the Drouin Institute online boutique

It is now time to announce the 10 winners of the Drouin Institute contest launched on April 29th, 2020!

Congratulations to:

  • Jocelyne R.
  • Lyne G.
  • Luc C.
  • Jules Pierre L.
  • Gilles B.
  • Dan N.
  • Claudine P.
  • Jean-Guy B.
  • Liette N.
  • André D.

The winners were given the opportunity to choose between a yearly subscription to Genealogy Quebec1000 PRDH-IGD hits and $200 credit on our online boutique.

A big thank you to our 4368 participants. In view of the enthusiasm generated by this contest, there is no doubt that we will repeat the experience. Keep an eye out!

60% off on the Drouin Institute online boutique until the end of May

If you weren’t one of our lucky 10 winners, we still want to give you an opportunity to save money. Enjoy 60% off all purchases on the Drouin Institute boutique with the code DROUIN2020! This offer is valid until June 1st, 2020.

To benefit from this promotion, simply enter the code DROUIN2020 on checkout.

The Drouin Institute online boutique includes all the books and CD-ROMs produced by the Drouin Institute, more than 4,000 items. It also offers directories and books from various historical and genealogical societies in Quebec, Ontario and the United States.

Again, thank you for your participation and your confidence.

Genealogically yours,

The Drouin team

Win a yearly subscription to Genealogy Quebec, 1000 PRDH-IGD hits, or $200 to spend on our online boutique!

The Drouin Institute is offering you the chance to win a yearly subscription to Genealogy Quebec, 1000 PRDH-IGD hits, or $200 to spend on our online boutique. Participating is free, quick and easy!

How to participate

All you need to enter the contest is a Genealogy Quebec account to which you have logged in at least once between April 29th 2020 and May 13th 2020, 3:00 PM EST. You do NOT need to have an active subscription on the account to be eligible for the contest.

If you do not have an account on Genealogy Quebec, simply create one (no credit card required). This should take you no more than a minute.


If you already own a Genealogy Quebec account, you must log in to it at least once between April 29th 2020 and May 13th 2020, 3:00 PM EST to ensure your participation in the draw. That’s all!

10 winners will be drawn at random on May 13th 2020 at 3:00 PM EST.

Make sure the email address associated with your Genealogy Quebec account is valid!
If you are drawn as a winner, you will be contacted via that email address. You will then have up to May 15th at 4:00 PM EST to claim your prize. If necessary, a second draw will take place on May 15th at 4:00 PM EST in order to allocate unclaimed prizes to new winners.

The prizes

Yearly subscription to Genealogy Quebec (Can$100 value) 

An annual subscription to Genealogy Quebec gives you access to the entire website and all its tools and collections for a period of 365 days.
Genealogy Quebec is a subscription-based research website regrouping all the collections and tools developed by the Drouin Institute over the course of its existence.

The website’s 15 tools and collections amount to over 46 million images and files covering all of Quebec as well as parts of the United States, Ontario and Acadia from 1621 to this day. Genealogy Quebec is by far the largest collection of Quebec genealogical and historical documents on the Web.
You will find more information about the website in this blog article.

 

1000 PRDH-IGD hits (Can$79.99 value)

PRDH-IGD is a directory of ALL vital events (baptisms, marriages and burials) recorded by the Catholic church in Quebec and French Canada from 1621 to 1849, as well as a genealogical dictionary of families. The PRDH-IGD database contains over 2 500 000 records.

What makes PRDH-IGD unique is how these records are connected to one another through genealogical links, which we refer to as Family Reconstructions. In addition to baptism, marriage and burial files, the PRDH-IGD contains individual and family files.

Any individual mentioned in a BMD record from the database is attributed an individual file. Similarly, any married couple mentioned in a BMD record gets their own family file.

PRDH-IGD subscriptions work by using “hits”. These hits are valid for 23 months.
A “hit” is used every time a record certificate, an individual file, a family file or a couple file is viewed. The original search that leads to the result list is free. You will find more information about the structure of the database at this address.

 

$200 to spend on our online boutique (Can$200 value)

The Drouin Institute online boutique includes all the books and CD-ROMs produced by the Drouin Institute, more than 4,000 items. It also offers directories and books from various historical and genealogical societies in Quebec, Ontario and the United States. You will be free to spend these $200 on any item(s) in the boutique.

Rules

  1. To be eligible for the draw, you must own a Genealogy Quebec account that was either created or logged into between April 29th 2020 and May 13th 2020, 3:00 PM EST.
  2. This contest ends on May 13th 2020, 3:00 PM EST, at which time the winners will be chosen at random.
  3. The 10 winners will be contacted by email one hour after the draw (May 13th 2020, 4:00 PM EST), and will have until May 15th 2020, 4:00 PM EST to claim their prize. Once this date has passed, the unclaimed prizes will be the subject of a new draw, and can no longer be claimed by the original winners.
  4. 48 hours after the initial draw, if necessary, a new draw will be done to award the unclaimed prizes to new winners. They will also have 48 hours to claim their prize. This process will be repeated until the 10 winners have been selected and have received their prizes.
  5. The 10 winners will be announced publicly on our Facebook page and via our newsletter once the 10 prizes have been distributed.
  6. Are excluded from this contest: Any employee and representative of the Drouin Genealogical Institute and the people with whom they are domiciled. Any institutional account (library, society, museum, school, etc.).
  7. Any litigation respecting the conduct or organization of a publicity contest may be submitted to the Régie des alcools, des courses et des jeux for a ruling. Any litigation respecting the awarding of a prize may be submitted to the board only for the purpose of helping the parties reach a settlement
  8. It is prohibited to create multiple Genealogy Quebec accounts in order to increase your chances of winning the draw. Individuals creating more than one account for this purpose will be disqualified.
  9. In order to select the 10 winners, a list will be produced from those eligible for the draw. Each individual in this list will be assigned a specific number (1, 2, 3, and so on). A random number generator will be used to generate a list of 10 numbers, and the individuals associated with these numbers will be the winners of the contest.
  10. A paid subscription to Genealogy Quebec, either current or previously active, is NOT necessary to participate in this contest.

 

Good luck!

The Drouin team

New records from Ontario and Acadia – Now over 46 million images and files on Genealogy Quebec!

Although the restrictions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic pose new challenges, the activities of the Drouin Genealogical Institute continue through teleworking.

Our indexing and digitizing efforts have allowed us to reach a new milestone on Genealogy Quebec, with now over 46 million images and files available on the website. This is another important step in our efforts to preserve and share the genealogical heritage of Quebec and New France, which wouldn’t be possible without our subscribers. Thank you!

Additionally, the indexing of parish registers from Ontario and Acadia is well on its way, with some 5920 baptism, marriage and burial records added to the LAFRANCE this month.


Marriage record as presented on GenealogyQuebec.com’s LAFRANCE

Here is an overview of the additions made for each parish:

Parish name Type of record Date range Number of records
Amherstburg (St-Jean) b 1802 1861 3990
Amherstburg (St-Jean) m 1825 1861 516
Amherstburg (St-Jean) d 1803 1861 1374
Ile-Royale b 1751 1757 3
Ile-Royale m 1742 1742 1
Ile-Royale d 1732 1744 8
Orléans b 1861 1861 1
Ottawa (Notre-Dame) b 1852 1852 1
Ottawa (St-Joseph) b 1858 1861 3
Paincourt b 1857 1859 8
Port-Royal m 1707 1747 2
Williamstown b 1855 1861 13
b = baptisms m = marriages d = deaths 

These records can now be browsed in the LAFRANCE, which also contains ALL of Quebec’s Catholic marriages from 1621 to 1918, ALL of Quebec’s Catholic baptisms and burials from 1621 to 1861 as well as ALL of Quebec’s Protestant marriages from 1760 to 1849.
You will find more information about the LAFRANCE on the Drouin Institute’s blog.

To conclude, we would like to wish you and your family health, safety and courage in the context of the health crisis we are experiencing. We hope that genealogy may bring you some joy during this difficult period.

Genealogically yours,

The Drouin team