Genealogy Quebec user guide

This guide will help you navigate the various pages and collections available on GenealogyQuebec.com.

Table of contents

Subscribing to GenealogyQuebec.com

GenealogyQuebec.com’s tools and collections require a subscription to use. In order to subscribe, head over to the subscription page, and select the subscription of your choosing (24h, 1 month, 1 year).

After selecting your subscription option, you will be redirected to the account creation process, where you will need to enter your email address as well as a username and password of your choosing.

Once you have entered and validated your account information, your account will be created. You will then be prompted to purchase your subscription.

On the subscription purchase page, you will be asked to select your payment method (Paypal or Credit Card) as well as to confirm your subscription option. Clicking on the “Pay” button will redirect you to Paypal or Stripe, depending on your payment method, and allow you to proceed with the payment.

Your subscription will be activated as soon as the payment is processed, which should be instant.

Please note that you can also subscribe by phone using your credit card by calling us at 514-400-3961.

Unsubscribing from GenealogyQuebec.com

If you’ve subscribed using Paypal or your credit card, your subscription will be set to renew automatically. To cancel this automatic renewal, head over to the unsubscribe page and click on “Stop the automatic payments”. If you’re having trouble with this process, contact us at contact@institutdrouin.com or 514-400-3961.

Logging into your GenealogyQuebec.com account

To start using your subscription, you must log into your Genealogy Quebec account. To do so, head over to the login page and enter the username and password you have selected earlier.

Password recovery

If you have lost or forgotten your password, head over to this page and enter your email address. You will receive an email containing a link which will allow you to select a new password for your account.

Accessing GenealogyQuebec.com’s tools and collections

To access Genealogy Quebec’s tools, you can use the “Search tools” tab in the menu bar.

Genealogy Quebec’s tools are separated in 3 categories.

  • Primary research tools

These are the most comprehensive and detailed tools available on the website: The LAFRANCE, the Marriages and Deaths 1926-1997 tool, and the Obituary section. For most of our subscribers, these 3 tools will be sufficient to find their ancestors and retrace their lineage. All of these tools are equipped with a search engine.

  • Secondary research tools

These are our complimentary research tools. They are used to address potential gaps in searches made using our primary research tools, or to add additional sources and information to these searches. All of these tools are equipped with a search engine.

  • Archival funds and databases

These tools use a file tree structure. They are not equipped with a search engine and must be browsed manually.

 

On the Tools page, users may get more information regarding each tool, such as the type of document, the period and region covered as well as a short tutorial, by clicking on “More information”.

Other useful links (guides, tutorials, FAQ)

What is the PRDH-IGD?

What is Genealogy Quebec?

Genealogy Quebec and PRDH-IGD: the similarities, differences, and why you should subscribe to both

Establishing your ancestry and finding your ancestors using Genealogy Quebec

FAQ – Frequently asked questions

Research helper – Keywords

This section gives you a concise overview of the period, regions and type of documents covered by each of Genealogy Quebec’s tools. Complimentary information is included between parenthesis when the period, region or type of document is only partially covered by the tool.

Period

17th century

18th century

19th century

20th century

21th century

Location

Quebec

Acadia

Rest of Canada

United States

Religion

Catholic

Protestant

Other

You will find a more detailed version of this research helper on this PDF file.

Using the LAFRANCE

The LAFRANCE


Using the Marriages and Deaths 1926-1997

Marriages and Deaths 1926-1997


Using the Obituary section

The Obituary section


Using the Drouin Institute’s Great Collections

Drouin Institute’s Great collections


Using the Petit NBMDS tool

The NBMDS tool


Using the Connolly File

The Connolly File


Using the Drouin Family Genealogies

Drouin Institute’s Family Genealogies


Using the Census tool

Censuses (1881-1901 Quebec and Ontario)


Using the Notarized documents tool

Notarized documents


Using the Postcards tool

Postcards


Using the Acadia – Families tool

Acadia – Families


Using the Drouin Collection Records

The Drouin Collection Records (1621 to 1967)


Using the Drouin Institute’s Miscellaneous Collections

Drouin Institute’s miscellaneous Collections


Using the Kardex

The Kardex


Using the Loiselle File

The Loiselle File


Using the City Directories

City directories

What is Genealogy Quebec?

Genealogy Quebec is a subscription based research website regrouping all of the collections and tools developed by the Drouin Institute over the course of its existence.

The website’s 16 tools and collections total for over 45 million images and files covering all of Quebec as well as part of the United States, Ontario and Acadia from 1621 to this day. Genealogy Quebec is by far the largest collection of Quebec genealogical and historical documents on the Web.

A Genealogy Quebec subscription gives access to the following tools (click on the tool’s name for more details):

  • The LAFRANCE – Index with link to the original document of all of Quebec’s Catholic baptisms and burials  from 1621 to 1861, all of Quebec’s Catholic marriages from 1621 to 1917 as well as all of Quebec’s Protestant marriages from 1760 to 1849.
  • Marriages and Deaths 1926-1997 – Index with link to the original document of most of the marriages and deaths celebrated in Quebec between 1926 and 1997, all religious denominations included.
  • La section Nécrologe – Index and original document of:
    • 2.2 million Canadian death notices published online between 1999 and today
    • 620 000 obituaries published in Quebec newspapers between 1945 and 2015
    • 54 000 death cards published between 1860 and today
    • 611 000 tombstones from Quebec cemeteries
  • Drouin Institute’s Great Collections – Digitization of the following collections:
  • La Masculine (Men Series)
  • Fichier Histor
  • Fiches Acadiennes (Acadian Cards)
  • Dossiers généalogiques Drouin
  • Affinités généalogiques Drouin
  • Petit Drouin
  • Dictionnaire national des Canadiens-Français
  • La Féminine (Woman Series)
  • Prévôté de Québec
  • Fiches Franco-américaines (Franco-American Files)
  • Patrimoine Familial
  • Patrimoine National
  • Kardex Noir
  • Drouin Collection Records – All of Quebec’s parish registers from 1621 to 1940, as well as some from part of Ontario, New England and Acadia.
  • The Petit NBMDS – Baptism, marriage and burial files from the Laurentides, Outaouais, Bas-St-Laurent as well as the city of St-Hubert, from 1727 to 2011.
  • The Connolly File – 6 500 000 Quebec baptism, marriage and burial files covering from 1621 to 2015.
  • Drouin Institute’s Family Genealogies – 660 family genealogies produced by the Drouin Institute during the 20th century. Totals for over 230 000 pages.
  • Drouin Institute’s miscellaneous Collections – Collection of images, documents, books, pictures and directories of historical and genealogical relevance. Contains the PRDH books, the Jetté dictionary, some municipal archives, old newspapers and much more.
  • Acadia – Families – Family files, with link to the related original documents, pertaining to Acadians. Covers more than 70 000 Acadian families between the years 1621 and 1849.
  • Postcards – Contains 256 000 postcards sent or received over the course of the 20th century. Can be searched by sender or recipient.
  • Loiselle File – 1 044 434 marriage files covering all of Quebec as well as Fall River, MA and Manchester, NH from 1621 to the 1950s.
  • Census – Contains Quebec’s 1881 and 1901 censuses as well as Ontario’s 1881 census.
  • Notarized documents –  Contains some 83 000 notarized documents indexed by type of contract, cited names, name of the notary, date and location. Linked to a digitized version of the original document.
  • The Kardex – Marriage files covering from 1621 to 1950 for Quebec, Ontario as well as a small part of the United States.
  • City directories –  Contains a digitized version of Montreal (Lovell – 1843 to 2000) and Quebec city’s (Marcotte – 1822 to 1904)  directories.

Subscriptions

There are 3 types of subscriptions to GenealogyQuebec.com. All 3 subscriptions give access to the entire library of tools and databases; only the length of the subscriptions differ.

24h access – 5$

Monthly subscription – 13$

Yearly subscription – 100$

Prices are in Canadian dollar. Taxes will be applied for Canadian residents.

User guide – Getting familiar with the website

Genealogy Quebec is geared towards both seasoned genealogists and novices alike. While a certain familiarity with the website is necessary to make the most of its 16 tools and collections, the majority of our users are able to retrace their ancestors through our 3 main tools, which happen to be the more straightforward and easy to use.

We have separated the collections in 3 categories in order to guide our less experienced users towards the right tools:

  • Primary research tools

These are the most comprehensive and detailed tools available on the website: The LAFRANCE, the Marriages and Deaths 1926-1997 tool, and the Obituary section. For most of our subscribers, these 3 tools will be sufficient to find their ancestors and retrace their lineage. All of these tools are equipped with a search engine.

  • Secondary research tools

These are our complimentary research tools. They are used to address potential gaps in searches made using our primary research tools, or to add additional sources and information to these searches. All of these tools are equipped with a search engine.

  • Archival funds and databases

These tools use a file tree structure. They are not equipped with a search engine and must be browsed manually.

 

On the Tools page, users may get more information regarding each tool, such as the type of document, the period and region covered as well as a short tutorial, by clicking on “More information”.

You will find a series of articles about our numerous tools and collections on our blog.

Establishing your ancestry and finding your ancestors using Genealogy Quebec.

Genealogy Quebec and PRDH-IGD: the similarities, differences, and why you should subscribe to both

PRDH-IGD.com and GenealogyQuebec.com are genealogical research websites managed by the Drouin genealogical Institute.

Genealogy Quebec

Genealogy Quebec contains all of the genealogical data, collections and tools developed and acquired by the Drouin Institute over the past 100 years. You will find on the website over 44 million images and files distributed through 16 different tools and collections.

You will find more detailed information about these 16 tools here, and about the website in general at this address.

PRDH-IGD

The PRDH-IGD was created from a Université de Montréal database and is in constant evolution. You will find more information about the PRDH-IGD and its content in this article.

What are the differences between PRDH-IGD.com and GenealogyQuebec.com?

GenealogyQuebec.com PRDH-IGD.com
Period 1621 – 2019 1621 – 1849
Original documents Yes No
Family reconstructions No Yes
Type of documents BMS records, obituaries, death cards, tombstones, notarized documents, censuses, marriage repertories, parish records, postcards, city directories BMS records, Individual files, Couple files, Family files
Subscription type Time based (24h, 1 month, 1 year) Purchasable “hits”

What are the advantages of being subscribed to both websites, and how do the subscriptions interact?

Members who are subscribed to both GenealogyQuebec.com and the PRDH-IGD.com have access to the following exclusive features:

  • View the original document (parish register) on GenealogyQuebec.com from any PRDH-IGD.com certificate

    Click on the mention circled in red to go from a PRDH-IGD.com certificate (left) to the original document associated with it on GenealogyQuebec.com (right)
  • View the PRDH-IGD.com individual file of any individual named in a GenealogyQuebec.com‘s LAFRANCE certificate

    Click on the mention circled in red to go from a GenealogyQuebec.com certificate (left) to an individual file on PRDH-IGD.com (right)
  • 10% bonus PRDH-IGD hits free of charge on purchase for GenealogyQuebec.com subscribers
    During the purchasing process on PRDH-IGD.com, you will be given the option to enter your GenealogyQuebec.com username to receive 10% additional hits free of charge

    Note that a delay of a few days is to be expected before the reception of your bonus hits as we need to treat your demand manually.

Establishing your ancestry and finding your ancestors using Genealogy Quebec

This guide will provide you with detailed instructions which will help you establish your ancestry and find your ancestors using the tools available on Genealogy Quebec. Examples of the challenges you may encounter while establishing your ancestry are used throughout the guide.

Defining ancestry

Your ancestry denotes all of your ancestors as far back as they are traceable, starting with your parents. With each generation, the amount of ancestors you have doubles: 2 parents, 4 grandparents, 8 great grandparents, etc.
An ancestry can be total, or can be limited to a subset of ancestors:

  • Paternal ancestry (all the ancestors on the paternal side of your ancestry) or maternal ancestry (all the ancestors on the maternal side of your ancestry)
  • Patrilineal (father, grandfather, great grandfather, etc.) or matrilineal (mother, grandmother, great grandmother, etc.) An ancestry can be unlimited, going as far back as the genealogical sources allow, or limited to a certain amount of generations. The key to establishing an ancestry is the marriage record. Most marriage records will contain the name of the spouses’ parents or the name of the previous spouse, which are necessary in order to trace back an ancestry.

Tools

Genealogy Quebec offers a multitude of complementary genealogical tools which you will need to find your ancestors.

  • The LAFRANCE, which contains, among other things, all the Catholic marriages from Quebec between 1621 and 1916. Thanks to a refined search engine, you will be able to search without worrying about the different variations of a specific name. A link to the original document is included with every record. It is through the LAFRANCE that you will establish the majority of your ancestry. You can browse the LAFRANCE here (subscription required).
  • The Men and Women series and the Kardex are marriage directories covering a period that goes up to 1940. These directories will be the bridge between your starting point and the first LAFRANCE marriage (in other words, the first pre-1917 marriage) of your ancestry. You can browse the Men and Women series here, and the Kardex at this address.(subscription required).
  • The 1926 – 1997 marriage index, with a link to the original record included in every document. You can browse the Marriages and deaths 1926-1997 tool here (subscription required).

The initial objective

Finding your ancestors using the LAFRANCE is easy once you find a marriage that predates 1917. The real challenge is to find that marriage.

When establishing your ancestry on Genealogy Quebec, your initial objective is to find a marriage that predates 1917. You will be able to do so by using our Marriage 1926-1997Men series, Women series and Kardex tools.

The process

The ancestry of Bertrand Desjardins, born on the 24th of November 1948 in Montreal, will serve as our example throughout this guide.

First step – Gathering information

To find your ancestors using Genealogy Quebec, you must begin by establishing all the information you have on your family. It is always a good idea to ask parents, grandparents and other family members for clues and information regarding the family. The more information you start with, the easier your research will be. Make sure to have all this information readily available when starting your research.

Ex:

Here is the information established by Bertrand before the start of his research.

Subject:

Bertrand Desjardins, born on the 24th of November 1948 in Montreal

Parents:

François-Joseph Desjardins born in 1908, died on the 1st of September 1963 and Suzanne Bertrand, born in 1919, died on December 31st 2014, married in 1943 in Montreal.

Grandparents:

François-Joseph Desjardins’ parents: François Desjardins, died in July 1955 and Anna Jacques, died on September 1st 1975.

Suzanne Bertrand’ parents: Émile Bertrand, died on the 4th of November 1961 and Irène Michaud, died in june 1942.

Additional information:

François-Joseph is the eldest child of his family; Suzanne is the second child. François Desjardins’ father is Charles Desjardins.

Second step – Using the information to find your ancestors

It is now time to use the information we’ve gathered in the first step. First of all, we must verify whether this information allows us to track down a marriage that predates the year 1917. If that is the case, a simple search for the wife and husband’s names in the LAFRANCE should allow us to find the marriage record.

If that is not the case, we will have to turn to the complementary tools. Using your notes, try to find the earliest marriage you can get your hands on. This marriage will be your starting point.

If this marriage took place between 1917 and 1940, use the Men and Women series and the Kardex for your research.

(Unable to find the marriage you are looking for? Contact us at contact @ institutdrouin.com, we will point you in the right direction!)

Ex:

Let’s go back to Bertrand Desjardins’ attempt at discovering his ancestors using the Genealogy Quebec website.

Paternal ancestry

It is now time for Bertrand to put the information gathered during the previous step of his research to use. The first thing Bertrand notices is that his father, François-Joseph Desjardins, was born in 1908. This signifies that François-Joseph’s parents, François Desjardins and Anna Jacques, were married in 1908 at the latest; children born out of wedlock were a rarity at the time. A simple search for their names in the LAFRANCE should lead to their marriage.

Search for the marriage of a Desjardins with a Jacques in the LAFRANCE.
Results from the previous search. The result we’re interested in is the last in the list.

Within minutes, Bertrand was able to find the first LAFRANCE mariage of his paternal ancestry.

François-Eugène Desjardins and Anna Jacques’ marriage sourced from the LAFRANCE

The marriage record indicates that François Desjardins’ parents are Charles Eugène Desjardins and Marie Malvina Fortin. A search in the LAFRANCE should allow us to find their marriage.

Search for Charles Desjardins and Marie Malvina Fortin’s marriage in the LAFRANCE
Search results from the previous search. The first result is the one we are interested in.
Charles Desjardins and Marie Malvina Fortin’s marriage sourced from the LAFRANCE

The marriage record tells us that Charles Eugène Desjardins’ parents are Alexandre Roy Desjardins and Léocadie Gagnon.

From this point on, it is simply about repeating the process of searching for the parents’ marriage until we reach the first immigrant of the lineage. In Bertrand’s case, the first immigrant is Alexandre Roy dit Desjardins, who married Marie Major on the 11th of September 1668 in Québec city.

Antoine Roy dit Desjardins and Marie Major’s marriage sourced from the LAFRANCE

Bertrand Desjardins’ paternal ancestry is completed within minutes thanks to the LAFRANCE. All that is left now is the presentation of this work.

There are several templates available on the internet to organize and present your ancestry.

Bertrand Desjardins’ paternal ancestry completed using GenealogyQuebec.com

Maternal ancestry

His paternal ancestry completed, Bertrand decides to tackle the maternal side of his family. This time, there is no way to know if Bertrand’s grandparents’ marriage was celebrated before 1917. A LAFRANCE search for Émile Bertrand and Irène Michaud yields no results. Bertrand must now turn to the Drouin Great Collections; the Men and Women series and the Kardex.

To use the Men and Women series, head over to the Drouin Institute’s Great Collections category and click on “Search by family in the Great collections”.

The search is done by family name.

Search for the Bertrand family name in the Drouin Institute Great Collections

The results are separated by tools and are ordered in alphabetical order of the subject’s first name. As a result, an Albert would be found on the first few pages in the results. A Zenophile would be on the last page.

Results from the previous search

Note that it is possible for an individual to be sorted by his secondary first name. Émile could be sorted under Joseph Émile, since there is no distinction between the primary and the secondary first name. Similarly, a woman could be sorted under Marie despite usually being known under a different name.

The format used in the Men and Women series isn’t the most intuitive. This image should help you understand the layout:

Schema explaining the layout of the Men and Women series

Searches for the surnames Bertrand in the Men Series and Michaud in the Women Series produced no relevant results. The Kardex is next.

The Kardex must be navigated manually, as it doesn’t come with a built in search engine.

The files are sorted by letter and by the name of the husband.

Navigating the Kardex down to the folder susceptible to contain Emile Bertrand’s marriage file

Since we are looking for Émile Bertrand’s marriage, we have opened the BertrandEdouard – BertrandHypolite folder. The first file will contain the marriage of an Edouard Bertrand. Seeing as the files are ordered in alphabetical order of the husband’s first name, Émile Bertrand’s file should be among the first ones.

Unfortunately, the file isn’t in this folder.

As mentioned earlier, it is possible that Émile could be identified as Joseph Émile in his marriage file. To verify this possibility, we must look into the BertrandJoseph folder.

Note that the files are first sorted by the man’s first forename, and then by the woman’s surname. The marriage file of a Joseph Émile and a Michaud will be found at Michaud and not at Émile.

The file was in fact in the BertrandJoseph folder, sorted by Michaud.

Kardex file
  1. Bertrand, Joseph Alfred Émile – Husband
  2. (Bertrand), Antoine Wilfrid – Husband’s father
  3. St-Aubin, Rose Anna – Husband’s mother
  4. Michaud, Marie Lise Irène – Wife
  5. (Michaud), Joseph Adolphe – Wife’s father
  6. Bernard, Marie Lise Elisa – Wife’s mother
  7. St Louis de France de Montréal – Parish
  8. 12 juin 1915 – 12th of june 1915, marriage date

(Please note that this guide was made when the period covered by the LAFRANCE ended in 1914. Today, we would’ve been able to find the Bertrand / Michaud marriage with a simple search in the LAFRANCE, as the period it covers extends to 1917, and the marriage was celebrated in 1915.)

We now know that Émile’s parents are named Antoine Wilfrid Bertrand and Rose Anne St-Aubin. We should be able to find their marriage in the LAFRANCE.

Search for the marriage of Antoine Wilfrid Bertrand and Rose Anna St-Aubin in the LAFRANCE
Search results
Antoine Wilfrid Bertrand and Rose Anna St-Aubin’s marriage sourced from the LAFRANCE

The next step is to find Antoine Wilfrid Bertrand’s parents’ marriage in the LAFRANCE, and to follow the paternal lineage all the way up to the first immigrant.

This first immigrant is Jean Bertrand, who married Marie Charlotte Brar on the 23rd of September 1697 in Montreal.

Jean Bertrand and Marie Charlotte Brar’s marriage sourced from the LAFRANCE

Bertrand’s maternal ancestry is completed.

Bertrand Desjardins’ maternal ancestry

Complicated cases

In the world of genealogical research, it is often necessary to call upon one’s inner detective. Sometimes, the usual procedure doesn’t lead to the desired results. In those cases, a certain amount of creativity and initiative is necessary to pull through.

For a good example of that, let’s go back to Bertrand Desjardins’ paternal ancestry. Bertrand had no difficulty finding his grand-father’s marriage in the LAFRANCE thanks to the information established at the start of his research.

Let’s now imagine a scenario where Bertrand’s initial gathering of information did not allow him to find his grand-parents’ names. Essentially, Bertrand’s starting point is now his own parents and the only information available to him is his parents’ marriage date, their dates of birth and the date of death of his father.

François-Joseph Desjardins born in 1908, died on the 1st of September 1963 and Suzanne Bertrand, born in 1919, died on December 31st 2014, married in 1943 in Montreal.

Since marriages don’t go past 1916 in the LAFRANCE and 1940 in the Great Collections, Bertrand has to turn to the Marriages and Deaths 1926-1997 tool.

A search for a Desjardins and Bertrand couple in the Marriage 1926-1997 section allows us to find their marriage:

François Joseph Desjardins and Suzanne Bertrand’s marriage sourced from the Marriages 1926-1997 tool

While this document provides us with tons of interesting information, it doesn’t help us find Bertrand’s grand-parents’ marriage, as they aren’t mentioned in the record.

This is when some initiative and creativity is required to push the research further.

We know François Joseph Desjardins died on the 1st of September 1963.

Still in the Marriage and Deaths 1926-1997 tool, but this time in the Death 1926-1997 section, let’s attempt to find François Joseph’s death record.

François Joseph Desjardins’ death certificate sourced from the Death 1926-1997 tool

We are able to find his death record. Luckily, the file indicates that the mother’s name is JACQUES, A. and that the father’s name is DESJARDINS, F. A search for a Desjardins/Jacques couple in the LAFRANCE will allow us to find their marriage, and to trace back Bertrand’s paternal ancestry.

Conclusion

The instructions and examples given in this guide will cover most of the situations you will encounter when establishing your ancestry on Genealogy Quebec.

Do not hesitate to contact us at contact @ institutdrouin.com if you have any questions regarding this guide or the process of retracing your ancestors.

What is the PRDH-IGD?

The PRDH-IGD is a directory of ALL vital events (baptisms, marriages and burials) celebrated by the Catholic church in Quebec and French Canada from 1621 to 1849, as well as a genealogical dictionary of families (Family Reconstructions). The PRDH-IGD database contains over 2 500 000 records.

What makes the PRDH-IGD unique is how these records are connected to one another through genealogical links, which we refer to as Family Reconstructions. In addition to the baptism, marriage and burial files, the PRDH-IGD contains individual and family files.

Any individual mentioned in a BMD record from the database is given an individual file. Similarly, any married couple mentioned in a BMD record gets their own family file.

To better understand the importance and value of family reconstructions, we will explore the database by using the example of François Plouf, who lived in St-François-Xavier-de-Verchères in the 18th century.

Search for the baptism of François Plouf in the PRDH

To begin the search, the information is entered in the search template. In this case, we are searching for any mention of a Francois Plouf in the database, without limiting the search to a specific period or parish.

Search results for any mention of Francois Plouf in the PRDH database

We obtain a list of results for our search.

  • The first column gives us the record number, which is used to identify the record in the database
  • The second column gives us the date of the event
  • The third column gives us the type of record (baptism, burial or marriage)
  • The fourth column gives us the parish in which the event was celebrated
  • The role column tells us what role the individual has in the record
  • The sex, standard name and standard first name columns are self explanatory

We will select the 14th result, which is the baptism of François Plouf, celebrated on the 27th of November 1718 in Contrecoeur.

François Plouf’s baptism file sourced from the PRDH

This baptism file was created from the original record. It extracts all the relevant information from it and presents it in a convenient manner.

In a PRDH-IGD baptism, marriage or burial file, every name is a link to that person’s individual file. By clicking on François Plouf’s name, we are taken to the following file.

François Plouf’s individual file in the PRDH

The individual file centralizes all of the mentions of an individual in the database, such as the person’s baptism, burial and marriage. The individual file also mentions the parents as well as the spouse(s).

Again, every name is also a link to that person’s individual file. Additionally, written dates can be clicked to be taken to that event’s certificate.

Finally, the “First marriage” and “Family” mentions link to the appropriate family file. Let’s explore François Plouf and Marie Ursule emery Codere’s family file.

François Plouf and Marie Ursule Emery Codere’s family file from the PRDH database

A family file is created for any married couple mentioned in a record certificate in the database. This family file centralizes all the information available on the couple as well as all of their children, and provides links to the individual files and record certificates that pertain to the family.

The family file can be seen as the final result of the PRDH’s family reconstruction process.

Ultimately, the PRDH-IGD database can be described as a massive family tree of all Catholic individuals who lived in Quebec between 1621 and 1849.

The database is being corrected and added to on a monthly basis, and we hope to be able to extend the period it covers shortly.

GenealogyQuebec.com integration

Members who are subscribed to both GenealogyQuebec.com and the PRDH have access to the following exclusive features:

  1. View the original document (parish register) on GenealogyQuebec.com from any PRDH-IGD.com certificate
  2. View the PRDH-IGD.com individual file of any individual named in a GenealogyQuebec.com‘s LAFRANCE certificate
  3. 10% bonus PRDH-IGD.com hits free of charge on purchase for GenealogyQuebec.com subscribers

What are the differences between the PRDH-IGD.com and GenealogyQuebec.com?

GenealogyQuebec.com PRDH-IGD.com
Period 1621 – 2019 1621 – 1849
Original documents Yes No
Family reconstructions No Yes
Type of documents BMS records, obituaries, death cards, tombstones, notarized documents, censuses, marriage repertories, parish records, postcards BMS records, Individual files, Couple files, Family files
Subscription type Time based (24h, 1 month, 1 year) Purchasable “hits”

How to subscribe to the PRDH-IGD?

PRDH-IGD subscriptions are hit based.

hit is charged each time a page is displayed, except for the list of references obtained from a query, which is not charged. A subscription thus corresponds to the right to view a certain quantity of one or the other of the following elements: a certificate from the Repertory of vital events (record certificates), an individual or family file from the Genealogical dictionary or a couples’ file with their married children from the Repertory of couples.

You will find the various subscription options at this address.