Over 100,000 new historical documents on Genealogy Quebec

Over 100,000 historical images have been added to the Drouin Miscellaneous Collections, one of 15 tools available to Genealogy Quebec subscribers.

The Drouin Miscellaneous Collections contain an assortment of images, documents, books, photos and directories of historical and genealogical interest. You can consult this tool at this address.

Here are the documents added via this update:

Journal Écho Abitibien

  • 50,000 new images from 1950 to 1980
  • Can be consulted in the Miscellaneous Collections under the 23 – Journaux anciens/L’Écho Abitibien/ folder

Fonds André Hurtubise

  • 32,000 new images have been added to this collection, which contains BMD cards, newspaper clippings, historical photos, and many other documents.
  • Can be consulted in the Miscellaneous Collections under the 14 – Fonds d’archives/Fonds André-Hurtubise/ folder

Fonds Philippe Beaudry

  • 22,000 images have been added to the Fonds Philippe Beaudry. This collection contains postcards and historical documents related to maritime transportation.
  • Can be consulted in the Miscellaneous Collections under the 14 – Fonds d’archives/Fonds Philippe BEAUDRY/ folder

Trace your ancestors and discover your family history with tens of millions of historical on Genealogy Quebec today!

Genealogically yours,

The Drouin team

Growing your Family Tree: Key Documents for Genealogy

The family tree is an essential tool for any genealogy enthusiast, as it allows you to trace and visualize your family history over several generations. If you want to grow your family tree with accurate and complete information, you will inevitably have to refer to various types of historical documents.

basic family tree structure
Basic family tree structure, with the number of individuals doubling every generation

In this article, we will explore the most common types of historical records used in genealogy, explaining how they can help you build a complete and detailed family tree.

Civil and religious records

If you had to limit yourself to one type of document for your genealogical research, it would undoubtedly be church and civil records. These records contain the vital events of a population, namely births (or baptisms), marriages, and deaths (or burials).

church record used for building a family tree
Example of a church record. Source: LAFRANCE, GenealogyQuebec.com

How church and civil records help you grow your family tree

Church and civil records contain a lot of interesting information pertaining to their subject; their name, date of birth, marriage or death, place of birth, residence or death, and often the names of their parents and/or spouse.

Not only can you plug this information in your family tree, you can also use it to go back one generation in the line you are researching.

More specifically, the marriage record is the key to your genealogical research, as in most cases, it will contain the names of the parents of the spouses.

marriage from genealogy quebec used to make a family tree
Marriage from the LAFRANCE on Genealogy Quebec

The names of the parents of the spouses are indicated in the marriage on the left. Searching for them allows you to find their marriages, in which you will find the names of their respective parents. By repeating this process, you can go back through the generations and easily complete your family tree.

The best sources of Quebec church and civil records

Quebec birth records and baptisms – The best free and paid sources

Quebec marriage records – The best free and paid sources

Quebec death records and burials – The best online sources

Obituaries and Headstones

Obituary notices and tombstones are among the most commonly used documents in genealogy, as they contain a wealth of information about the individuals and cover periods that are not available through other types of documents.

How obituaries and headstones help you grow your family tree

Although civil and religious records are essential to your research, they are rarely available for the modern period. Indeed, for privacy reasons, it can be very difficult or even impossible to find recent records, which complicates the task of filling in the contemporary part of your family tree.

This problem does not exist for headstones and obituaries. In the case of headstones, they can be visited and catalogued in local cemeteries. As for obituaries, they are published daily in newspapers and on the Internet. Therefore, many collections covering the contemporary period are available to genealogists.

It should also be noted that obituaries and headstones often mention family members of the deceased, which is crucial to allow you to bridge the generations in your family tree.

The best sources of obituaries and headstones in Quebec

The Obituary section on Généalogie Québec contains nearly 5 million obituaries, memorial cards and headstones from Quebec and Ontario.

There are also many sites dedicated to the publication of obituaries online. These sites are indexed by search engines such as Google and Bing, which makes finding an obituary on the Internet very simple.

Generally, all you have to do is enter the name of the deceased into your favorite search engine and browse the first few results. However, if the name is very common, it may be necessary to add terms such as “obituary” or “death notice” to your search. If an obituary is present on one of these sites, you will find it among the first results of your search.

Censuses

Censuses are important sources for genealogy because they provide information about a family’s members and where they lived at a specific time.

How censuses help you grow your family tree

Censuses can help you identify a person’s family members, including children, spouses and parents. By comparing censuses from different years, you can also track changes in family composition.

In addition, they allow you to confirm information found in other sources, such as religious or civil records. For example, you can confirm dates of birth, places of residence, occupations and names of family members.

Finally, census records can provide you with details about the daily lives of the family members you are researching, such as their occupations or education levels. This information can help to reconstruct the lives of your ancestors beyond names and dates and to flesh out your family tree.

The best sources of censuses in Quebec

On Genealogy Quebec, you will find the Quebec censuses for the years 1881 and 1901, and the Ontario census for the year 1881. These contain more than 5 million individuals.

The Library and Archives Canada site allows you to browse through many censuses of Quebec and Canada.

Drouin Collection rescanning on Genealogy Quebec

135,000 images from the registers of 158 Catholic and Protestant parishes in Quebec have been rescanned on Genealogy Quebec, to improve their quality and clarity.

Over a million images from the Drouin collection have been rescanned and made available on the website over the past few years.

The resolution of these new images is two to three times higher than that of the previous copy, which ensures superior clarity.

Browse all of Quebec’s parish registers as well as millions of historical documents by subscribing to Genealogy Quebec today!

The Drouin Collection Records

The Drouin Collection Records are a collection of parish registers (baptisms, marriages and burials) covering all of Quebec and French Acadia as well as parts of Ontario, New Brunswick and the Northeastern United States, from the parish’s foundation up to the 1940s and sometimes 1960s.

You can browse the Drouin collection with a subscription to Genealogy Quebec at this address.

The LAFRANCE, also available to Genealogy Quebec subscribers, is a search engine allowing you to explore these parish registers by searching for the individual(s) mentioned in them.

You can browse the LAFRANCE at this address.

List of rescanned parishes

Here is the list of the parishes that have been rescanned in this update.

Arthabaska (Missions)Caughnawaga (United Church)Delson (United Church)
DorionDrummondville (St-Frédéric)Durham-Sud (St-Fulgence)
East BroughtonFrampton (St-Édouard)Greenfield Park (United Church)
Hampstead (United Church)Hudson (United Church)Lac-Etchemin
Lachine (Sœurs Ste-Anne)Lachine (United Church Grace)Lachine (United Church Saint Andrew)
Lac-Mégantic (Ste-Agnès)Lambton (St-Vital)Longueuil (United Church Gardenville)
McMasterville (United Church)Montréal (Aide à la Femme)Montréal (Anglican, Christ Church)
Montréal (Assistance Maternelle)Montréal (Basilique Notre-Dame)Montréal (Cimetière de l’Est)
Montréal (Congrégation Notre-Dame)Montréal (Couvent des Franciscains)Montréal (Crèche de la Miséricorde & Hospice de la Maternité)
Montréal (Holy Cross)Montréal (Hôpital Notre-Dame)Montréal (Hôpital Ste-Justine)
Montréal (Hôpital Ste-Justine)Montréal (Hôpital St-Luc)Montréal (Longue-Pointe, St-François-d’Assise)
Montréal (Monastère des Carmélites)Montréal (Monastère du Bon-Pasteur)Montréal (Saint Anthony of Padua)
Montréal (St-Bernard)Montréal (St-Charles)Montréal (Ste-Jeanne-d’Arc)
Montréal (Ste-Marguerite-Marie)Montréal (Ste-Thérèse-de-l’Enfant-Jésus)Montréal (St-Jean-Baptiste-Vianney)
Montréal (St-Louis-de-Gonzague)Montréal (St-Sauveur)Montréal (Très-Ste-Trinité)
Montréal (United Church All Nation)Montréal (United Church Calvary)Montréal (United Church Calvin Westminster)
Montréal (United Church Centenary)Montréal (United Church Central)Montréal (United Church Chalmers)
Montréal (United Church Chinese Montreal)Montréal (United Church City Mission)Montréal (United Church Côte-des-Neiges)
Montréal (United Church Crystal Springs)Montréal (United Church Dominion Douglas)Montréal (United Church Emmanuel)
Montréal (United Church Erskine & American)Montréal (United Church French Saint John)Montréal (United Church French Sauveur)
Montréal (United Church French Summerlea)Montréal (United Church Hospital Mission)Montréal (United Church Hungarian)
Montréal (United Church Inspector Mission)Montréal (United Church Italian of the Redeemer)Montréal (United Church La Croix)
Montréal (United Church Livingstone)Montréal (United Church Main Memorial)Montréal (United Church Mount Royal)
Montréal (United Church Mountain Street)Montréal (United Church North End)Montréal (United Church Norwood)
Montréal (United Church Port de Montréal)Montréal (United Church Private Chapel)Montréal (United Church Rockfield)
Montréal (United Church Rosedale)Montréal (United Church Saint Columba House)Montréal (United Church Saint Cuthbert)
Montréal (United Church Saint Georges)Montréal (United Church Saint Giles)Montréal (United Church Saint Giles)
Montréal (United Church Saint James)Montréal (United Church Saint Luke)Montréal (United Church Saint Mark)
Montréal (United Church Shaw Memorial)Montréal (United Church Westminster Central)Montréal, Rosemont (United Church Central)
Montréal, Rosemont (United Church First)Montréal-Est (St-Octave)Montréal-Est (United Church)
Montréal-Nord (Ste-Gertrude)Montréal-Nord (St-Vital)Montréal-Sud (United Church)
Montréal-West (United Church)Mont-Royal (United Church First)Pointe-aux-Trembles (Crèche St-François-d’Assise)
Pointe-aux-Trembles (Filles Consolatrices du Divin Cœur)Pointe-aux-Trembles (Pères Capucins)Pointe-aux-Trembles (United Church, Française Évangélique)
Pointe-Claire (Ste-Jeanne-de-Chantal)Pointe-Claire (United Church, Lilly Memorial)Pointe-Fortune (United Church)
Princeville (St-Eusèbe-de-Stanfold)RichardvilleRigaud (Jardin de l’Enfance)
St-Albert-de-WarwickSt-AlfredStandon (St-Léon)
St-AnselmeSt-BenjaminSt-Benoit-Labre
St-Cœur-de-Marie (Mégantic)St-Côme-KennebecSt-Cyprien (Dorchester)
St-Cyrille-de-WendoverSte-Anne-de-Bellevue (United Church Union)Ste-Claire (Dorchester)
Ste-Clotilde (Dorchester)Ste-Clotilde-de-HortonSt-Edmond-de-Grantham
Ste-Élisabeth-de-WarwickSte-Hélène-de-ChesterSte-Jeanne-d’Arc (Drummond)
St-Elzéar-de-LinièreSt-Éphrem-de-TringSte-Séraphine
Ste-Sophie (Ste-Sophie-d’Halifax)St-Eugène-de-GranthamSt-Évariste-de-Forsyth
St-Ferdinand (St-Ferdinand-d’Halifax)St-Frédéric (Beauce)St-Germain-de-Grantham
St-Hubert (St-Jean-Eudes)St-Jean-Baptiste-Marie-VianneySt-Lambert (Notre-Dame-du-Sacré-Cœur)
St-Lambert (United Church)St-Laurent (United Church Saint Andrew)St-Léonard (St-Léonard-de-Port-Maurice)
St-LucienSt-Majorique-de-GranthamSt-Nicéphore
St-Norbert-d’ArthabaskaSt-Paul-de-ChesterSt-Pierre-Baptiste
St-Rémi-de-TingwickSt-RosaireSts-Anges
St-ValèreThetford Mines (St-Alphonse)Thetford Mines (St-Maurice)
Tingwick (St-Patrice)Vallée-JonctionVictoriaville (Ste-Victoire)
Ville-Émard (St-Jean-de-Matha)Warwick (St-Médard)Westmount (Ascension of Our Lord)
Westmount (United Church Saint Andrew)Wickham 

Genealogically yours,

The Drouin team

Over 2.8 million deaths added to the LAFRANCE on Genealogy Quebec

2,802,719 deaths from the Deaths 1926-1997 collection have been imported into the LAFRANCE, one of 15 tools available to Genealogy Quebec subscribers.

These deaths cover all of Quebec from 1926 to 1997.

Death of James Gordon Canning on March 18, 1943. As the source documents for the records of this collection do not contain information regarding the place of death of the individual, it is their place of residence that is displayed at the top of the certificate.

Prior to being imported into the LAFRANCE, these records were subjected to a verification process, and hundreds of thousands of corrections were applied to the name and location fields.

Trace your ancestors with the millions of historical documents available on Genealogy Quebec starting today!

Name standardisation and the resemblance function

Our main motivation for importing these records into the LAFRANCE is its superior search engine, which is equipped with name standardisation and the resemblance function.

When searching in the LAFRANCE, name standardisation ensures that a name is associated with all of its variants. For example, a query for an individual with the surname Gauthier will prompt the search engine to look through the database for any mention of the name Gauthier as well as all of its variations, such as Gautier, Gaulthier, Gotier, etc. Thus, it is not necessary to search for each variant of a name individually when using the LAFRANCE, as was the case when using the Deaths 1926-1997 tool.

In addition to name standardisation, the LAFRANCE is equipped with the resemblance function, which allows searching for a name and any other name that resembles it with a single query. The resemblance function differs from name standardisation as it not only includes all of the variants of a name, but also all of the names that are similar to it in terms of pronunciation and spelling. For example, with the resemblance function activated, a search for Gauthier, which will include all of the variants listed earlier, will also include the names Gonthier, Vauthier, Gouthier, Authier as well as their numerous variations.

Centralization

An obvious benefit of adding these records to the LAFRANCE is the centralization of the website’s documents within a single database. This allows our subscribers to carry out more efficient and rapid searches on the site, without having to jump around between collections.

In addition to the records added today, the LAFRANCE contains:

  • ALL of Quebec’s Catholic marriages from 1621 to 1918
  • ALL of Quebec’s Catholic baptisms from 1621 to 1861
  • ALL of Quebec’s Catholic burials from 1621 to 1861
  • ALL of Quebec’s Protestant marriages from 1760 to 1849
  • 2,580,000 Quebec civil marriages from 1926 to today
  • 1,450,000 Quebec Catholic marriages from 1919 to today
  • 80,000 Quebec civil marriages from 1969 to today
  • 140,000 Ontario marriages from 1850 to today
  • 38,000 marriages from the United States
  • 3,000 Quebec Protestant marriages from 1850 to 1941
  • 68,000 miscellaneous baptisms and burials from 1862 to 2019

Genealogically yours,

The Drouin team

Connolly File update: 29,549 new BMD records on Genealogy Quebec

An update has been applied to the Connolly File, one of the 15 tools available to Genealogy Quebec subscribers.

17,095 births, 4514 marriages and 7978 deaths from Quebec and the United States were added through this update.

What is the Connolly File?

The Connolly File is an index of births, marriages and deaths from Quebec and French-speaking parts of the United States and Canada covering a period spanning from 1621 to today. It is developed and maintained by the Société de généalogie des Cantons-de-l’Est.
The tool contains over 6,868,849 birth, marriage and death records.

You may browse the Connolly File with a subscription to Genealogy Quebec at this address.

You can trace your ancestors with the Connolly File as well as tens of millions of other documents by subscribing to Genealogy Quebec today!

Update details

Here is a more detailed overview of the update.

Granby Notre-Dame 
M: 1844-1940: 3261 records

Ste-Cécile de Frontenac
B: 1889-1940: 2561 records
M: 1889-1940: 402 records
D: 1889-1940: 1022 records

St-Germain-de-Grantham
B: 1857-1940: 7496 records
M: 1857-1940: 1268 records
D: 1857-1940: 3387 records

St-Luc, Grosse-Ile, Montmagny
B: 1834-1936: 403 records
M: 1834-1936: 42 records
D: 1834-1936: 835 records

Church of England, Grosse-Ile, Montmagny
B: 1840-1922: 127 records
M: 1840-1922: 16 records
D: 1840-1922: 487 records

As well as over 12,500 records from the United-States.

Genealogically yours,

The Drouin team

22,000 obituaries added on Genealogy Quebec

Over 22,000 obituaries have been added to the Obituary Section, one of the 15 tools available to Genealogy Quebec subscribers.

These obituaries were published and in Quebec newspapers and date from the 20th and 21st centuries.

You can browse these new documents with a subscription to Genealogy Quebec at this address.

Subscribe to Genealogy Quebec and start tracing your ancestors today using over 50,000,000 genealogical and historical images and documents!

The Obituary section

This section contains most of the obituaries, memorial cards and headstones available on Genealogy Quebec. It is divided in 4 sub-sections:

  • Internet obituaries, which contains over 2.95 million obituaries published online from 1999 to today.
  • Newspaper obituaries, which now contains over 1,332,000 newspaper obituaries published between 1860 and today
  • Tombstones, which contains more than 740,000 pictures of headstones from hundreds of cemeteries in Quebec and Ontario.
  • Memorial cards, which contains near 100,000 memorial cards published between 1860 and today.

These collections are indexed and can be explored using a search engine. You will find more information about this section on the Drouin Institute’s blog.

Genealogically yours,

The Drouin team

Over 2.4 million marriages added to the LAFRANCE on Genealogy Quebec

2,483,450 marriages from the Marriages 1926-1997 collection have been imported into the LAFRANCE, one of 15 tools available to Genealogy Quebec subscribers.

These marriages cover all of Quebec from 1926 to 1997.

Jean Charest and Michèle Dionne’s marriage, from the Marriages 1926-1997 collection, as presented on the LAFRANCE

Prior to being imported into the LAFRANCE, these records were subjected to an exhaustive verification process, and hundreds of thousands of corrections were applied to the name, date and location fields.

Trace your ancestors with the millions of documents available on Genealogy Quebec starting today!

Name standardisation and the resemblance function

Our main motivation for importing these records into the LAFRANCE is its superior search engine, which is equipped with name standardisation and the resemblance function.

When searching in the LAFRANCE, name standardisation ensures that a name is associated with all of its variants. For example, a query for an individual with the surname Gauthier will prompt the search engine to look through the database for any mention of the name Gauthier as well as all of its variations, such as Gautier, Gaulthier, Gotier, etc. Thus, it is not necessary to search for each variant of a name individually when using the LAFRANCE, as was the case when using the Marriages 1926-1997 tool.

Click on the image above to test out the LAFRANCE‘s name standardisation

In addition to name standardisation, the LAFRANCE is equipped with the resemblance function, which allows searching for a name and any other name that resembles it with a single query. The resemblance function differs from name standardisation as it not only includes all of the variants of a name, but also all of the names that are similar to it in terms of pronunciation and spelling. For example, with the resemblance function activated, a search for Gauthier, which will include all of the variants listed earlier, will also include the names Gonthier, Vauthier, Gouthier, Authier as well as their numerous variations

Centralization

An obvious benefit of adding these records to the LAFRANCE is the centralization of the website’s documents within a single database. This allows our subscribers to carry out more efficient and rapid searches on the site, without having to jump around between collections.

In addition to the records added today, the LAFRANCE contains:

  • ALL of Quebec’s Catholic marriages from 1621 to 1918
  • ALL of Quebec’s Catholic baptisms from 1621 to 1861
  • ALL of Quebec’s Catholic burials from 1621 to 1861
  • ALL of Quebec’s Protestant marriages from 1760 to 1849
  • 1,450,000 Quebec Catholic marriages from 1919 to today
  • 80,000 Quebec civil marriages from 1969 to today
  • 140,000 Ontario marriages from 1850 to today
  • 38,000 marriages from the United States
  • 3,000 Quebec Protestant marriages from 1850 to 1941
  • 17,000 miscellaneous Quebec marriages from 2018 and 2019
  • 68,000 miscellaneous baptisms and burials from 1862 to 2019

More information regarding the LAFRANCE can be found on the Drouin Institute’s blog.

Genealogically yours,

The Drouin team

Over 65,000 obituaries added on Genealogy Quebec

More than 65,000 obituaries have been added to the Obituary Section, one of the 15 tools available to Genealogy Quebec subscribers.

These obituaries were published online and in newspapers. They cover various regions of Quebec and Canada and date from the 20th and 21st centuries.

You can browse these new documents with a subscription to Genealogy Quebec at this address.

Subscribe to Genealogy Quebec and start tracing your ancestors today using over 50,000,000 genealogical and historical images and documents!

The Obituary section

This section contains most of the obituaries, memorial cards and headstones available on Genealogy Quebec. It is divided in 4 sub-sections:

  • Internet obituaries, which contains over 2,95 million obituaries published online from 1999 to today.
  • Newspaper obituaries, which now contains close  to 1,310,000 newspaper obituaries published between 1860 and today
  • Tombstones, which contains more than 740,000 pictures of headstones from hundreds of cemeteries in Quebec and Ontario.
  • Memorial cards, which contains near 100,000 memorial cards published between 1860 and today.

These collections are indexed and can be explored using a search engine. You will find more information about this section on the Drouin Institute’s blog.

Genealogically yours,

The Drouin team

German migration to New France

(The first article of this series can be found here.)

My name is Claude Crégheur, and in this second article of my series on the German presence in Quebec, I will focus on Germanic migration during the New France era.

The first marriage of a German found in the registers of Notre-Dame de Québec is that of Hans Bernhardt and Marie de Bure, widow of Gilles Enart, on December 27, 1666.

Marriage of Hans Bernhardt and Marie de Bure from the register of Notre-Dame-de-Québec
Marriage of Hans Bernhardt and Marie de Bure from the register of Notre-Dame-de-Québec
Source: Record 66714, LAFRANCE, GenealogyQuebec.com

The marriage is under the name Jean Bernard, a surname which will survive him. The record indicates that he was from “the parish of Ste-Croix de Thionville, diocese of Trèves in Germany”; Thionville is in Lorraine, which is now French territory.

In 1666, the Duchy of Lorraine was also French. Indeed, France had annexed it to its territory in 1648, as well as Alsace, following the Thirty Years’ War. In 1860, Berlin demanded the return of the two provinces according to the principles of nationalities defined by language. Germany got its wish through the Treaty of Frankfurt on May 10, 1871, after the French defeat in the Franco-Prussian War. This political entity then took the name of Reichsland Elsaß-Lothringen.

Among the contemporaries of Hans Bernhardt, we have Georg Stems married to Marie Perodeau on September 16, 1669 at Notre-Dame de Québec. Georg, a stonemason, was from the city of Luzern in Switzerland.

Marriage of Georg Stems and Marie Perodeau from the register of Notre-Dame-de-Québec
Marriage of Georg Stems and Marie Perodeau from the register of Notre-Dame-de-Québec
Source: Record 66846, LAFRANCE, GenealogyQuebec.com

We then have Peter Mahler married to Jeanne Gueneville on November 3, 1671, also at Notre-Dame de Québec. He is said to have originated from Escalis in Germany. As this city does not exist, it was surely a bad reading or transcription of what Henri de Bernières, the celebrant, heard.

Marriage of Peter Mahler and Jeanne Gueneville from the register of Notre-Dame-de-Québec
Marriage of Peter Mahler and Jeanne Gueneville from the register of Notre-Dame-de-Québec
Source: Record 67023, LAFRANCE, GenealogyQuebec.com

We should also mention Léonard Créquy, who signs Lenart Kreickeldt, originally from the bishopric of Cologne in Germany. He married Catherine Trefflé dit Rotot on May 22, 1680 at Notre-Dame de Québec and was a carpenter, master cabinetmaker and sculptor.

Marriage of Lenart Kreickeldt from the registry of Notre-Dame-de-Québec
Marriage of Lenart Kreickeldt from the register of Notre-Dame-de-Québec
Source: Record 67220, LAFRANCE, GenealogyQuebec.com

Here we have the sailor Jean D’Eyme, or rather Johann Deigme, patriarch of the Daigle dit Lallemand families. In his marriage certificate on November 5, 1685 in Charlesbourg with Marie-Anne Proteau, he is said to be from Vienna in “Lower Germany”. Could it be Vienna in Austria? It is quite possible, but we cannot confirm it for the moment.

PRDH family file of Jean Daigle L'Allemand and Marie Anne Proteau
PRDH family file of Jean Daigle L’Allemand and Marie Anne Proteau
Source: Family file 5587, PRDH-IGD.com

And finally, we have shoemaker André Spénard, who signs Andre Spennert, originally from Lorraine according to his marriage certificate recorded on April 5, 1690 at Notre-Dame de Québec with Marie Charlotte Thérèse Arnaud. Interestingly, Leonard Créquy, mentioned earlier in this article, is present at the wedding and signs Lennart Creigie (and not Lenart Kreickeldt as he did at his own wedding).

We also sometimes deal with more mysterious cases, such as that of the marriage of Denis Lagneau and Marie Anne de Kierk/Decker on September 15, 1718 at Notre-Dame de Québec. Marie Anne is said to be from Saxony in Germany. How did an unmarried German woman end up in Quebec? A mystery! After 1723, we lose track of the couple.

Marriage of Marie de Denis Laigneau and Marie Anne Dekierk from the register of Notre-Dame-de-Québec
Marriage of Marie de Denis Laigneau and Marie Anne Dekierk from the register of Notre-Dame-de-Québec
Source: Record 68199, LAFRANCE, GenealogyQuebec.com

As we can see, these German immigrants were mostly tradesmen, as was the case for the first French settlers in New France. It would be very interesting to know how they got wind of this opportunity, especially considering the geographical distance separating them from the French west coast.

It is also important to mention that the Catholic religion did not seem to be an obstacle to the integration of German immigrants into Quebec society, as would be the case a century later.

Germanic surnames are likely to have irritated the ears of New France’s priests and notaries who, despite their level of education, mistreated them or simply Frenchified them as in the case of Vogel in Loiseau, or Schneider in Tailleur.

In my next article, I will focus on German immigration around the Seven Years’ War.

Claude Crégheur

Marriages 1926-1997 update: 2.6 million individuals added

Around to 2.6 million individuals have been added to the index of the Marriages 1926-1997 collection, one of the 15 tools available to Genealogy Quebec subscribers.

These individuals are the parents of the spouses, who were not included in the index until today.

Marriages 1926-1997

This collection includes the majority of marriages celebrated in Quebec between 1926 and 1997, which represents nearly 2.5 million records. The original document can be viewed in addition to the index.

In 1975, the government started including the spouses’ parents in these marriage forms, doing so until 1993. The parents are also mentioned in the 1926 version of the form. It is these individuals that were added to the collection’s index today.

You can consult the Marriages 1926-1997 collection with a subscription to Genealogy Quebec at this address.

Trace your ancestors and discover your family’s history using more than 50 million images and historical documents by subscribing to Genealogy Quebec today!

Genealogically yours,

The Drouin team